Course Schedules



COVID-19 IMPACT ON COURSE SCHEDULES

Please note: for the Summer 1 term, there is a ‘1st preference’ schedule and a ‘possible virtual schedule.’ There are two possible options for when these courses will be offered. The College's preference is to offer courses in-person but if this is not possible due to COVID-19, we are committed to still offering classes through virtual methods.


Fall 2020 - Summer 1 2021 course schedule

Service Learning Track - BA in Theology and Culture

The innovative Service Learning track of the Bachelor of Arts in Theology and Culture prepares students to make an impact in a wide variety of fields that require people who integrate faith and reason and leaders who possess integrity.

The service learning track is for students who want to:

•    Explore classical and contemporary perspectives on justice, religion, ministry, education and more
•    Participate in volunteer and for-credit experiential learning activities
•    Develop a deeper understanding between the relationship of faith and justice and their role in society

Contact

Need help with your application? Contact a St. Mark's College Recruiter to review your course history and eligibility.

Email: [email protected]


Bachelor of Arts in Theology and Culture

Are you looking for a degree that supports your intellectual, moral and spiritual formation?


The BA in Theology and Culture forms engaged citizens and disciples committed to the integration of faith and reason; to encounter and dialogue; and to the development of connecting the love of God, neighbour, and creation.

Students develop their individual potential and discern their distinctive gifts and talents in service to the common good.

Through a study of the liberal arts, including theology, English, and history, students investigate classical and contemporary texts and perspectives with an eye to cultivating a range of multidisciplinary tools and skills

Key features of the BA in Theology and Culture

Liberal Arts Focus

A liberal arts education cultivates the essential skills of critical and creative thinking, as well as an ability to communicate. These skills will benefit all students. This program fosters exchanges between the Catholic intellectual tradition, the humanities and the social sciences.

Learning Environment

Students in the BA benefit from smaller class sizes, from a dedicated team of professors and advisors working across the liberal arts, and from a strong cohort identity that allows them to learn with and from one another.

Service Learning Opportunities

Students in the BA program have a number of service learning opportunities. In second and third year, students may choose to do a non-credit placement in a Catholic social service institution, or Catholic school.

Volunteer service is also encouraged throughout the years of the degree, whether service to the College community, or through charitable organizations such as the Door is Open, L’Arche, or other non-profit organizations.

BA Seminar in Theology and Culture

The BA Seminar in Theology and Culture invites students to reflect personally and collectively on a range of contemporary issues, exploring these topics in dialogue with the Christian tradition.

BA Capstone

In their final year students will complete the BA Capstone, an experiential learning project. The capstone provides opportunities for students to explore their interests in areas such as teaching, ministry, social services, non-profit organizations, and more. Students who hope to become teachers will have the opportunity to do a pre-practicum in a Catholic school.

Courses

The Bachelor of Arts in Theology and Culture provides a liberal arts education cultivating the essential skills of critical and creative thinking, as well as an ability to communicate. This program fosters exchanges between the Catholic intellectual tradition, the humanities and the social sciences.

For the first two years of the program, students are cross-enrolled at Corpus Christi College where they can choose from a wide array of courses. In third and fourth year, students take courses exclusively with their BA cohort. Throughout the degree students engage in a range of experiential learning activities within the school and greater community.
View Courses

What can you do with a degree in Theology and Culture?

Students in the BA in Theology and Culture are prepared for future careers in a number of fields, including social work, community services, ministry, non-profits, and education (elementary, secondary, Catholic, public).

There are three tracks within the BA program that help support your future goals:

Education

This track is for aspiring teachers who want to teach in Catholic, faith-based, or public schools.  Our program is recognized by UBC’s Faculty of Education, which means graduates are eligible to apply to the teacher preparation (BEd) program at UBC. Learn more

Service Learning

This track prepares students to make an impact in a wide variety of fields that require people who integrate faith and reason and leaders who possess integrity. Learn more

Vancouver School of Theology (VST)

This track is an innovative new pathway for students who are aspiring to pursue graduate studies in theology at VST. Students can complete an undergraduate degree and take up to eight VST graduate courses in the foundations of theological, pastoral and biblical study to meet advanced program requirements. Learn more






St. Mark’s College is the right place for you

Location - Learn on the UBC campus

St. Mark’s is located right on the UBC campus. That means we can offer our students the ‘best of both worlds’.

The experience of a big university campus – UBC – and many of the services and amenities UBC offers plus the experience of a smaller campus at St. Mark’s providing a more accessible, supportive learning environment, with smaller classes by design. Students are also eligible to take a UBC course as a visiting student.

Benefit from Your UBC Affiliate Status

As a St. Mark’s student, you are also a UBC affiliate student. That means you can take advantage of many UBC services:
•    Centre for Accessibility
•    Counselling
•    Centre for Writing and Scholarly Communication
•    Libraries
•    Recreation facilities
•    U-Pass
•    And much more

Participate in UBC Events and Clubs

While at St. Mark’s, you can attend UBC events like Storm the Wall and Student Nights at the Pit. You can also participate in organized UBC clubs, and organized intramural sports at UBC, such as volleyball, Ultimate, and more, in addition to the clubs at St. Mark’s.

Specialized Support Programs to Help You Succeed

Develop the skills you need to achieve your educational and career goals.

Get from Point A to Point B

If you already know what your end-goal is, we will help you get there.
If you do not know what your end-goal is yet, our program can help you figure out your educational and career goals – because we are committed to your success. Our experiential learning will give you the chance to try out different ideas, and our dedicated advisors will work directly with you.

Be a Name, Not a Number

You will be assigned your own academic advisor for individual attention and academic support. Professors will know you by name, and are often able to offer academic and career guidance. Through the volunteering and field-based experiences, you can get ideas of potential jobs. You can also find job opportunities at our Career Development Centre.

Vibrant Student Life Programs

You can access our Student Life teams for social, personal, and spiritual support. Enjoy the Running Club, Pizza Days, Pumpkin Carving, International Food Forums, and much more.

Scholarships and Financial Aid

We offer a dedicated Financial Aid Advisor to help you navigate our scholarship and bursary application process, and apply for government financial aid programs.

Unique Experience Beyond the Classroom

Much more than time in the classroom.

Make a Difference

We focus on fostering:
•    Academic confidence
•    A nurturing community
•    Positive values
•    Social justice in action
•    Leadership skills

You will be joining a highly engaged group of students who are active members of their cohort, school and community.

Beyond the classroom, you can take advantage of experiences dedicated to building all important ‘soft-skills’ through active involvement – such as networking, on-the-job experience, campus life, teamwork and leadership skills.

Our students are encouraged to give back and make a difference in the world. You can take courses on pressing social issues, travel on service-learning trips, and give back to the less fortunate through a multitude of volunteer opportunities.


Foundations of the Catholic Faith: Theology for Ministry

Are you currently involved in or discerning a call to ministry in a parish, school or pastoral office? Foundations of the Catholic Faith at St. Mark’s College will deepen your understanding and appreciation for the Catholic tradition.


Reflect on and respond to your baptismal calling to serve the Kingdom of God in the Church and in the world in a welcoming learning environment.

This course gives students an opportunity to reflect individually and collectively on their ministerial practice and is designed to help them refine their identities as disciples and ministers. Students will be introduced to several methods of theological reflection and discernment. The week will culminate with a full-day retreat that focuses on spirituality and integration.

The knowledge and skills developed over the course will not only benefit you, but also the communities you serve.


Build towards a Master's degree


If you are thinking about studying graduate theology and this is your first theology course, THEO 500: Theology for Ministry could be counted as the elective toward your master's degree.

Speak with the dean to learn more and to get permission to take the course for credit: [email protected]


Course details

Dates: October 1st to December 3, 2020 - Thursday evenings from 6:00pm – 8:30pm
Location: The course will now be offered virtually and taught synchronously
Instructors: Dr. Nick Olkovich, Father Nick Meisl
Cost: $450.00

Course goals

1.    To cultivate one’s personal relationship with Jesus Christ;
2.    To develop a basic understanding of and deepening appreciation for the core elements of the Catholic tradition;
3.    To reflect, both individually and collectively, on the relationship between course content, Christian living and ministerial practice;
4.    To understand and articulate one’s identity as a disciple and minister called to serve the Kingdom of God in Church and world;
5.    To develop further one’s personal spirituality and to cultivate skills for theological reflection, prayer and discernment essential to effective ministry in the 21st century;
6.    To develop an appreciation for life-long learning and spiritual growth.

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About the Instructors

Fr. Nick Meisl teaches Scripture at Corpus Christi and St. Mark’s Colleges and serves in parish and high school ministry.

Dr. Nick Olkovich is an Assistant Professor and holds the Marie Anne Blondin Chair in Catholic Theology at St. Mark’s College. He has served as an RCIA Director, Youth Minister and Parish Catechist.





Questions?

Please contact Dr. Lynda Robitaille at St. Mark’s College for information
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 604-822-4463 Ext. 129

Summer Institute

Take advantage of the St. Mark’s Summer Institute. New and returning students have the option of completing a Catholic Core course, an elective course, or both.

Synchronous video streams for courses run Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from July 5-23. Students have until late August to complete their coursework.

THEO 530: Christian Morality (Dr. Carolyn Roeber, OP)
    Morning class, 9:00am - 1:00pm
    Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from July 5-23

This course will introduce students to the sources, development, and history of moral theology using scriptural, patristic, theological, and magisterial sources. Particular attention will be given to the "foundational" moral theology of the Catholic tradition and the call of the Second Vatican Council for the renewal of this discipline by a return to its sources and an integration of moral studies with other areas of theology

THEO 514: Theories of Religious Development (Dr. Michael Dallaire)
   Afternoon class, 1:00pm -5:00pm
   Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from July 5-23

This course places various psychological and philosophical theories of human development as well as the insights of critical theorists in dialogue with the theological insights of conversion and mercy. This dialogue grounds a hermeneutic of Christian hope that is responsive to the challenges of our times.


Spotlight on student experience

"Deciding to take the Catholic Core Courses at St. Mark’s College, particularly during Covid-19, has been one of the smartest decisions of my life. At first, I felt some trepidation as I last undertook an academic course 9 years ago; however, the entire experience has been so positive and enlightening, I am delighted I did and would definitely encourage others to undertake them as well.

The learning environment is very collegial and supportive; in our classes, our contributions were always valued, not only by the professors, but also by our classmates. It is a wonderful way of learning from each other and forming new relationships. My teaching ministry will definitely be informed by my study at SMC: I am actually looking forward to sharing what I have learned with my students and colleagues. My faith life and appreciation of the liturgy has benefitted, too, from these studies on Scripture and Theology and the readings we have done in class; my choice of bedtime reading material now isn’t novels but the Bible and Apostolic Exhortations! Every Christian Education teacher should take the Catholic Core at SMC - it’s a great place to learn!"

- Ann Marie McGrath, Educator
Summer Institute 2020



SUMMER INSTITUTE FAQ


Is it required that I come to Vancouver for the Summer Institute courses?

No. Attending classes virtually is always an option we offer to students who live outside of Metro Vancouver.
This year, due to COVID-19, all students will be taking their Summer classes virtually through live online courses. 

Synchronous, asynchronous, online, virtual, Zoom. So many new terms - how will my classes be offered?

Many people hear “online class” and think of a series of pre-recorded lectures and online interaction with no real-time interaction with a human. That’s not how our courses are offered.

Your classes will be virtual. The live online courses taking place in a digital classroom with real-time instruction and opportunities for face-to-face interaction with your professor and classmates.

Classes run on weekdays for two weeks. There will be a daily live lecture and class time. There may be required readings before each class and most other coursework is completed after classes end. You will have until late August to complete papers and other coursework.

Throughout the course you will be interacting with your professor and fellow classmates.

How do I access my online courses?

St. Mark’s College uses an online learning platform through UBC called Canvas. After you have registered  for the course, you will be contacted by the Enrolment Services Office with instructions for accessing your course materials. If you have questions, please contact Chisom Onwuli at [email protected].

Will I be able to talk to my instructor and classmates?

Yes. The course design and video software allows for two-way interaction. You will be able (even encouraged) to interact with your professor and classmates and engage in discussions.

What is the cost of taking a Summer Institute course?
The Summer Institute courses are full 3-credit courses. The tuition cost can be found on the Tuition and Fees webpage.

NOTE: For the special circumstances during COVID-19, students will only pay the registration fee and tuition. All other fees in Summer II term are being waived.
Students who choose to audit the course pay a reduced rate.

As many of our students previously paid tuition in person, there are also special instructions on how to pay tuition during COVID-19.

How do I get the readings and books for my courses?

The list of required textbooks can be found through the online textbook list.

Readings may be shared directly by your professor or accessed through the libraries of St. Mark’s College and UBC.
 

Do I qualify for admission?

We have admission categories to accommodate various backgrounds including those with no previous post-secondary education, or those who wish to take classes as “auditing students” without going through the full application process. Visit our Admission Requirements webpage for more information.

If you’d like to speak to someone about starting your studies with St. Mark’s College, email [email protected].

More Questions?

Contact Dr. Lynda Robitaille
Email: [email protected]



VST Track - BA Degree in Theology and Culture

St. Mark’s College and the Vancouver School of Theology (VST) have launched an innovative new pathway for students without an undergraduate degree who are aspiring to pursue graduate studies in theology at VST.


Within the St. Mark’s College Bachelor of Arts in Theology and Culture, students can complete an undergraduate degree and take up to eight VST graduate courses in the foundations of theological, pastoral and biblical study to meet advanced program requirements for their Master of Divinity (MDiv) degree.

Throughout the degree, all undergraduate students take courses together and participate in a Seminar in Theology and Culture. In third and fourth year, the VST Track students take the eight foundations courses at VST.

Upon successful completion of the St. Mark’s undergraduate program, students are eligible to pursue admission into the Master of Divinity program at VST with advanced standing, having already completed the equivalent of one year in VST’s foundation courses.

Note: Completion of the St. Mark’s BA in Theology & Culture does not guarantee admission to a VST graduate program. Full application and consideration by the VST Admissions committee is required, normally in the final term of undergraduate studies.

insert_drive_fileView 4 year schedule

Learn on the UBC campus

As a St. Mark’s student, you will enjoy state-of-the-art learning facilities on the UBC campus with some classes in the newly updated VST building. Close to St. Mark's College, UBC’s bus loop and major campus facilities, the VST building boasts smartboards, bright and comfortable study spaces, and a dynamic student population.

Enjoy a vibrant community

The St. Mark’s College main campus is steps from the VST building. As a student, you will benefit from our active Campus Life and Ministry Office, and have full access to research materials at the John Micallef Library, study spaces and much more.

Take advantage of UBC amenities

As a St. Mark’s student, you are also an affiliated UBC student, giving you direct access to a myriad of UBC clubs, amenities, academic resources and wellness services.



“Our new partnership with St. Mark’s College gives us the ability to ready students for master’s level study at VST in the neighbourhood. Because VST professors teach in the last year of this undergraduate program through St Mark’s, we extend the period of student formation and provide direct entry to our master’s level programs. This agreement reflects our ecumenical commitments and gives a profound witness to our common faith and commitment to excellent education."

-Rev. Dr. Richard Topping, VST Principal



“This ecumenical partnership is a joyous moment for the Community of St. Mark’s at UBC and the Vancouver School of Theology. It reflects our shared interest in engagement and encounter, and our belief that there is more that unites us than divides us.”
-Dr. Peter Meehan, St. Mark's College Principal


Contact

Need help with your application? Contact a St. Mark's College or VST Recruiter to review your course history and eligibility.

St. Mark’s College
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 604-822-4463

Vancouver School of Theology
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 604-822-6502




Spiritual Formation Schedule

The Ignatian spiritual formation program is designed to help students, faculty and staff harmonize head knowledge with heart knowledge; integrate academic understanding with their lived faith experience, deepening and enriching the experience of each, and informing the dialogue between study, prayer, and ministry. The program is grounded in scripture and offers many methods for praying with scripture, encountering the living Word of God, and discerning God's everlasting invitation to us as we journey on the path to holiness. Students who will serve as deacons, educators, administrators, and leaders in other ministerial capacities receive tools for sharing these prayer methods with their respective audiences.  

Fall 2020 

September 12
Lectio DivinaThrough prayerful reading and discussion of selected scripture, students will deepen their understanding of encountering the Word of God through the prayer method of lectio divina.
September 26
Season of CreationThrough prayerful reading of selected scripture texts and Pope Francis' message for the World Day of Prayer for Care of Creation, students will explore their own role in caring for creation. 
October 17
Principle and FoundationThrough prayerful reading of selected scripture texts and various translations of St. Ignatius of Loyola's Principle and Foundation, students will examine their primary identity as a beloved child of God and how the interplay of their various secondary identities affects their relationships with God, self and others. 
October 31
Saints & Our Call to HolinessIn preparation for All Saints Day, students will examine a few saints and look at how their prayer and their mottos reflect their interior attitudes as well as their lived expressions of their faith; explore a few examples of ordinary but holy men and women doing extraordinary things for God; and allow quiet time to reflect on how the saints, individually and as a communion, inspire us and accompany us today.  
November 14ExamenStudents will learn how to pray St. Ignatius of Loyola's Examen or Prayer of Awareness as a way to be attentive to the presence and invitation of God in their daily life, to give God thanks for blessings, to seek forgiveness and healing, and to trust in God's accompaniment in the day to come. 
 November 28Advent Gospel ContemplationThrough prayerful reading of a selected Advent Gospel pericope, students will learn how to pray with Gospel contemplation, entering into the scene with Jesus and encountering the Living Word of God, and talking with Jesus as a trusted friend.


Winter 2021

January 9
Graced HistoryStudents will pray with selected scripture passages as an entry to reflecting on God's presence, activity and blessing in their lives.
January 16Graced HistoryStudents will pray with selected scripture passages as an entry to reflecting on God's presence, activity and blessing in their lives.
February 6
Voice of GodStudents will learn how to discern God's voice in the Ignatian tradition, with scriptural examples of how God has spoken to others as models for our own attentiveness to God's calling.
February 20The Name of God is Mercy Through prayerful reading of selected scriptural passages and relevant excerpts from Pope Francis' book, The Name of God is Mercy, students will begin to explore how we can "be merciful as your Father is merciful" (Lk 6:36).
March 6
The Name of God is Mercy Through prayerful reading of selected scriptural passages and relevant excerpts from Pope Francis' book, The Name of God is Mercy, students will begin to explore how we can "be merciful as your Father is merciful" (Lk 6:36).
March 27Holy Week Contemplation Through prayerful reading of a selected Holy Week Gospel pericope, students will learn how to pray with Gospel contemplation, entering into the scene with Jesus and encountering the Living Word of God, and talking with Jesus as a trusted friend.


Summer 1 2021

April 10The Fire WithinThrough prayerful reading and discussion of selected scripture and relevant texts, students will identify how our fundamental human need, our longing for intimacy, informs our daily decisions.
April 17The Fire WithinThrough prayerful reading and discussion of selected scripture and relevant texts, students will identify how our fundamental human need, our longing for intimacy, informs our daily decisions.
May 8Amazon SynodThrough prayerful reading and discussion of selected scripture and Easter Season reflections on the Amazon Synod by participants, students will have an opportunity to synthesize the experiences of the synod with their own socio-cultural contexts. 
May 29Amazon SynodThrough prayerful reading and discussion of selected scripture and Easter Season reflections on the Amazon Synod by participants, students will have an opportunity to synthesize the experiences of the synod with their own socio-cultural contexts. 
June 12Year-end ExamenStudents will have an opportunity to review prayerfully their year through God's eyes with the Prayer of Examen.
June 19Year-end ExamenStudents will have an opportunity to review prayerfully their year through God's eyes with the Prayer of Examen.

Frequently Asked Questions

You have questions, we have answers.


When are classes offered?

Graduate classes take place at St. Mark's College on Friday evenings and Saturdays. Between these weekend onsite sessions, instructors will connect with students through our online course platform.

I don't live in Vancouver. Can I study from a distance?

Yes, students can access the onsite portion of the course through video conferencing. There is a technology fee associated with this option.

If I come from a distance, is there somewhere that I can stay overnight on campus?

Yes, distance students often rent rooms at Carey Centre, which is across the street from St. Mark's College.

How long will it take me to complete a Master's degree?

The length of time for completion of a Master's degree depends on how students schedule their course load. Typically, a graduate degree can be completed in 3-4 years. A majority of our students are employed full-time and this often influences how they space out course loads. 

If a student annually takes two (2) courses in fall, two (2) courses in winter and one (1) course in summer term, they will be able to finish their programs in 3 years.

I want to take a course but do not intend to pursue a graduate program. Can I audit a course? 

Yes, many of our credit courses can be taken as audit courses. Auditing a course allows a student to take a class without seeking a grade or credit for a course. Students are expected to do the readings in order to prepare for in-class sessions. Students who audit a course do so for the purposes of self-enrichment and academic exploration. To discuss registration in a course as an auditing student, contact an Admissions Counsellor.

I do not have a Bachelor's degree. Can I still apply for graduate program?

Yes. Applicants without an undergraduate degree may apply as non-traditional learners. Under special circumstances, some students may be admitted without a first degree at the discretion of the Dean of Theology. Such applicants must write a history explaining how their work, volunteering, leisure activities, courses have contributed to their learning and preparation to take graduate theological courses. The Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada limits the number of students admissible without a first degree to a specific percentage per program.

Do you have a course catalogue available?

Yes. All available courses are listed on our website or you can view the PDF Course Catalogue.

Is financial assistance available for graduate students?

Yes. Students are eligible for government loans and St. Mark's College has scholarships available. Meet with our Financial Aid Officer to explore ways to fund graduate education.

When are the application deadlines?

St. Mark's College offers year-round admissions. Apply at anytime. The start dates for each semester will dictate when a student can begin the first class, if they are accepted. 
Semesters: Fall (September), Winter (January) or Summer (April)

What is the right program for me?

Deciding which program is right for you can be a daunting decision. St. Mark’s offers programs in Pastoral Studies, Pastoral Ministry for the Permanent Diaconate, Catholic Educational Leadership, Religious Education, and Theological Studies, each with a mix of core and concentration courses.

Review each program
and contact one of our Admissions Counsellors to discuss the program options and find out which is the best fit for you.




Frequently Asked Questions

You have questions, we have answers.


Do I automatically get into UBC's Faculty of Education after completing the BA in Theology and Culture?

Those who have graduated with their B.A. from St. Mark's must apply to UBC's Faculty of Education (or elsewhere) as any other student does. The B.A. is recognized by the Faculty of Education at UBC.

Part of the St. Mark's B.A. program is the focus on the Co-Curricular Record (CCR) with internship experiences in second year, and a pre-practicum in 4th year. These experiences give students a competitive advantage when applying to the Faculty of Education.

How will this degree help me get a teaching job in Catholic schools in British Columbia?

The BC Catholic school boards recognize this degree as giving a solid religious foundation for those preparing to be teachers, as well as a solid academic formation.

What can I expect from first and second year?

Expect to take sixty credits over the first two years. It is possible to take 5 courses each in Fall and Winter terms, leaving yourself free from May-August, or it is possible to spread courses throughout three or four terms and take fewer courses each term. Speak with an advisor to plan your schedule.

What can I expect from third and fourth year?

Third and fourth year consist of 63 credits, thus it is more than a full load of courses. Because of the way the courses are structured, expect to take 2 third year courses during your second or third year Summer term.
In your third year, 5 courses per term (Fall & Winter)
Spring (May-June) between third and fourth year, 2 courses
Fourth year,  4 courses per term (Fall & Winter) plus pre-practicum course (3 credits) over Fall & Winter Term

What is a Co-curricular Record (CCR)

A Co-curricular Record (CCR), in addition to one's academic transcript, tracks skills gained through activities completed by a student throughout their program, specifically activities that record growth in teaching as well as spiritual development.

The Co-Curricular Record (CCR) allows students to find meaningful volunteer and work opportunities on and off campus, and have their experiences documented on an official, printed post-secondary record.


Meet Our Faculty

St. Mark's College is blessed to have dedicated faculty that are committed to excellence in Catholic higher learning.

Benefit from the long and rich Catholic Intellectual Tradition through a rigorous intellectual discourse between yourself and our passionate faculty members. With degrees from Oxford, Gregorian University, Cambridge, Catholic University of America and other respected institutions, our faculty are ready to help you in the search of understanding and knowledge. 

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Frequently Asked Questions

Who is a deacon?
A Catholic deacon is an ordained minister who shares in the apostolic work of the Archbishop. The title "deacon" comes from the Greek word "diakonos," which means "servant." The vocation of deacon carries the profound responsibility to pour out one's life in service to others, just as Christ who came "not to be served, but to serve."

Why does the Church need deacons?
The Second Vatican Council emphasized the Church as Servant to all humanity, in its every condition, weakness and need. As a response to this vision, the Church restored the order of deacons as a concrete sacramental sign of our Lord Jesus Christ, in and at the service of the world. Through his ministry, the deacon serves as a reminder and a challenge to all the baptized, who are called to imitate Christ in their care for others. As Blessed John Paul II said, "the service of the deacon is the Church's service sacramentalized."

What do deacons do?
Through their ordination, deacons share, to a lesser extent, in the threefold apostolic ministry of the bishop: a ministry of Word, of Sacrament, and of Charity. Deacons are official teachers and preachers of the Gospel, they preside at celebrations of baptism, funerals, matrimony and they visit the infirm, the imprisoned, and the needy. They do not celebrate Mass, hear confessions, or anoint the sick.

Do all deacons eventually become priests?
No. The diaconate was restored as a permanent order, not simply a step to becoming a priest. Men who are discerning a vocation to the priesthood are often ordained to the diaconate. If they are later ordained priests, they do not stop being deacons, in the same way that a man does not cease to be a priest should he be ordained a bishop.

What is the difference between a deacon and a priest?
Deacons are ordained "not for the priesthood, but for service." The permanent diaconate is not a lesser version of the priesthood, but a unique vocation unto itself. Unlike a priest, a deacon may have a wife, a family, and a secular job; they are particularly called to bring Christ's service outside of church buildings and ecclesial structures, into their workplaces and family lives.

May a married man be ordained a deacon?
Yes, married men may be ordained deacons. Once ordained, however, a man may not marry. Both men who are single at ordination and deacons who are widowed after ordination have an obligation to celibacy. Understanding and valuing celibacy is thus an important matter for all deacons, married or single.

How is a married candidate's family involved?
Married men who wish to become deacons must be married for a number of years and have shown stability in their commitment. Moreover, they require the express written consent and support of their wives. Deacons with children must have already provided for, or must continue providing for their children; their ministry must not unduly affect their family life. A deacon's wife and children are of good reputation, leading strong Catholic lives in and outside the home.

What is expected of the wife of a deacon?
The wife of a diaconal candidate must be willing to participate, to the extent required, in her husband's formation, in order to understand the possible impact on her and on their family. The wife of a deacon is not obligated to any official or public ministry once her husband is ordained. There is no single model for her to follow and she may choose her level of involvement in ministry freely. Many wives are and continue to be heavily involved in ministry, but this involvement flows from their baptismal call as Christians, not as a result of their husbands' ordination.

Do deacons quit their jobs to work for the church full-time?
The majority of deacons remain employed at their secular jobs, but some deacons may be hired part-time or full-time to hold various positions within the Church as the Archbishop deems necessary. They are paid in the same manner as laypeople.

How will a married deacon find time for ministry with a job and a family?
It is important to remember that the deacon extends the sacramental presence of Christ's service outside of the church and into the secular world. A deacon is just as engaged in his ministry when he is at home or at work; he is a permanent and public sign of Christ the Servant, not matter where he is, or what he is doing. That being said, each deacon will collaborate with his family, his employer, his pastor, and his bishop on how to meet the needs of his ministry.

Is there an age limit for deacons?
In the Archdiocese of Vancouver, candidates must be between the ages of 35 to 65 at the time of their ordination.

Do candidates need to have university degrees?
Candidates to the diaconate need not hold university degrees, but they require the educational preparation to complete the academic theological component of the formation program, which is currently entrusted to St. Mark's College.

How are candidates trained for the diaconate?
The formation program rests on four pillars: human, spiritual, theological, and pastoral. Candidates build upon their existing human qualities to prepare for ministry, further developing the ability to work collaboratively with others, the capacity to relate to others' feelings maturely and appropriately, and the willingness to grow in the virtue of chastity.

Spiritual formation will consist of study days and annual retreats, days of recollection, and the regular guidance of a spiritual director. Candidates are expected to deepen their existing spiritual life through frequent participation in the celebration of the Eucharist, regular reception of the Sacrament of Penance, constant reflection on Holy Scripture, and dedication to the public prayer of the Church, the Liturgy of the Hours.

The academic component of theological formation will consist of a Diploma in Pastoral Studies. Candidates are placed in one of two streams based on their past academic work. The Graduate Diploma stream requires the work of a three-credit graduate course, and can later be used towards a Master's Degree. Those in the Diploma stream may not use their courses toward a degree, as they are assigned less work, chiefly one integrative assignment per course. Candidates who meet the requirements of the Graduate Diploma must pursue it, unless, for serious reason, the Director permits them otherwise. Diploma candidates may likewise be accepted to the Graduate stream if they qualify as "non-traditional learners."

The foundation of pastoral formation is supervised fieldwork, which integrates all the components of the formation program. Fieldwork is assigned according to the needs of the individual candidate, including: proclamation and preaching of the Word, homiletics, catechesis, liturgical ministry; liturgical ministry, the administration of the sacraments and sacramentals, service at the altar; works of charity and social justice, work in prisons, hospitals, and social service agencies; and servant leadership, guidance of small groups, volunteers, movements.

Technical subjects that pertain to specific ministerial activities may also be included in the program: psychology, catechetical pedagogy, sacred music, information technology and so on.

How long does it take to complete the formation program?
Diaconal candidates undergo at least four years of formation. The first phase is a one-year period called the aspirancy path. Aspirants and their wives take part in a six-weekend "Human and Spiritual Formation for Aspirancy" program, Friday to Sunday, to assist them in their discernment. The formation takes place in a residential setting, and no formal reports are made on performance or sharing during the workshops. During this period, the aspirant and his wife take time to assess how their lives and their family impacted if he proceeds to ordination. Unmarried aspirants use this time to discern their readiness to commit to celibacy.

The second phase, the candidacy path, lasts at least three years. Aspirants and their wives must first write to the Archbishop requesting admission and expressing consent to the candidate path of formation. The Advisory Committee makes a recommendation to the Archbishop, who meets with each aspirant and selects those to be admitted to candidacy. Candidates with some theological preparation may be dispensed from courses covering material already studied.

When does the formation take place?
The formation of candidates will take place on weekends, evenings, and holidays. Courses at St. Mark's College will take place during formation weekends from September to June during the candidacy phase, but may include courses during the aspirancy phase. There will be a directed reading program during the summer months.

During the final three years of formation, the candidates spend one weekend together each month (Friday evening to after lunch Sunday). They are also involved in reading and online study throughout the month, and may be asked to attend other seminars or events, along with an annual retreat.

How are deacons assessed in their readiness for the diaconate?
Each year of the candidacy, formation personnel will assess the candidate's readiness for ordination: his understanding of the diaconal vocation with its responsibilities and obligations, his human and affective maturity, his growth in the spiritual life, his knowledge of theology, and his practical skills in pastoral ministry. Psychological testing will be administered to all candidates at least before the beginning of the third year of the program. At the completion of each stage of formation, the candidate's spouse will be interviewed by a panel of two members of the Advisory Committee, at least one of whom will be a woman.

How can I learn more about becoming a deacon?
Contact the Director of the Permanent Diaconate Program, Msgr. Gregory Smith, who coordinates the overall application process. Msgr. Smith will review what you (and your wife) need to know, and will advise you to schedule an appointment with your pastor to seek his recommendation. Your pastor must confirm that you are: a practicing Catholic for at least five years, of good moral character and reputation, living married or celibate life conscientiously, involved actively in the parish or an ecclesial movement, and living a deep spiritual life by frequent attendance to Mass and participation in additional spiritual activities.

What happens next?
If your initial application and pastor's letter suggest that you are a suitable candidate, the Director arranges a tape-recorded Deacon Perceiver Interview to identify your talents and gifts for the diaconate. After the interview, the Director will meet with you (and your wife) to discuss the results as well as any other questions or concerns the two of you may have.

Suitable candidates are then given a formal application form and two confidential reference forms. Applicants must submit these forms, along with documentation confirming the applicant's age, identity, residency, academic achievement, and any previous theological formation, as well as a personal statement requesting admission into the program, a signed statement from the wife of a married applicant indicating consent for his application, recent photographs of the applicant and his wife, a consent form regarding psychological consultation, and a criminal record check. A medical report from the applicant's physician may be requested. A suitable married couple will interview the applicant and his wife in their home and provide a formal report to the Director and the committee.

Who chooses the candidates for the diaconate?
After completing the application process, the applicant is interviewed by three members of the PDP Advisory Committee, using a standard questionnaire. The Advisory Committee makes one of three recommendations to the Archbishop: immediate acceptance, deferral, or refusal. The Archbishop communicates his decision to the applicant by letter.

What are the key qualities of a deacon?
Deacons nurture a deep interior life and friendship with Christ that enables them to meet and balance their ministerial, work, and family obligations. Discerning a vocation to the diaconate requires prayer, dialogue and evaluation, as well as the involvement of the candidate, his family, and his parish. With the assistance of many, the Archbishop examines each individual's suitability using objective criteria that rely on the Church's tradition and recognize the particular pastoral needs of the Archdiocese.

Information from the Permanent Diaconate Office of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vancouver

Who can become a permanent deacon?

Diaconal candidates are:

  • Catholic males who have been baptized and practicing the faith for at least five years
  • Between the ages of 35 and 65 by ordination
  • Of good moral character and reputation
  • In a valid, stable marriage, or living celibately if unmarried or widowed
  • Actively involved in their parish or in an ecclesial movement
  • Of sound physical and psychological health
  • Economically stable and self-sufficient
  • Residents of the Archdiocese of Vancouver
  • Living a deep and sacramental spiritual life, as evidenced by their frequent attendance at Mass, reception of the Sacrament of Penance, and participation in spiritual exercises and retreats.


In addition, married candidates must have the consent and support of their wives, who must be willing to participate in their formation as needed. Diaconal candidates will seek the recommendation of their pastor, who will attest to the above traits, and express judgment as to their suitability to begin formation. Candidates from all cultural, professional and educational backgrounds are welcome.

Information from the Permanent Diaconate Office of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vancouver

The Permanent Diaconate

The Permanent Diaconate is a distinct vocation, or calling, to imitate Christ in His service to all humanity, to bring the world to Christ and Christ to the world.

The diaconate was established at the time of the apostles. In the early Church, some men were called to become deacons, ordained ministers who served the people of God under the direction of the Bishop. As a response to the recommendations of the Second Vatican Council, the Bishops of Canada reactivated the order of permanent deacons in 1969. In February 2011, Archbishop J. Michael Miller officially restored the permanent diaconate in the Archdiocese of Vancouver.

Deacons are called to serve. The title “deacon” comes from the Greek word “diakonos,” which means “servant.” Though all Christians by baptism are called to “diakonia,” or service, deacons serve as a public sacramental sign of Christ in and at the service of the world.

Like a priest, a permanent deacon is a member of the clergy who shares in the ministry of the Bishop. Unlike a priest, he may also have a wife, a family, and a secular job. 

Read Archbishop Miller's Pastoral Letter on Restoration of the Permanent Diaconate Program (February 2011)

What do permanent deacons do?

A permanent deacon is just as engaged in his ministry when he is at home or at work. He is a permanent sign of Christ the Servant, no matter where he is, or what he is doing. Permanent deacons do not celebrate Mass, hear confessions, or anoint the sick; they extend the sacramental presence of Christ’s service outside of the Church and into the secular world. Diaconal service is modeled after the threefold apostolic ministry of the Bishop:

Ministry of Charity
A permanent deacon personally serves the poor, the aged, the sick, and the imprisoned, bringing the Gospel to all those in need. He preaches and practices social justice.
Ministry of Word
Permanent deacons proclaim the Gospel and preach at liturgical celebrations. They provide catechetical instruction, adult faith formation, and sacramental preparation.
Ministry of Sacrament
Permanent Deacons assist priests during Mass, administer baptisms, witness marriages, preside at funerals and wakes, officiate at Benediction and lead community prayer services.

Information from the Permanent Diaconate Office of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vancouver



Graduate Programs

Are you ready to deepen your faith, ask the important questions, and open your mind in an environment of critical enquiry?


As the College’s mission statement highlights, programs offered are designed to prepare graduates who think rigorously in order to act rightly and serve humanity better.

St. Mark’s offers programs that are oriented primarily towards ministerial leadership: Pastoral Studies, Catholic Educational Leadership, Religious Education, and Theological Studies.

All graduate programs begin with a focus on the Catholic theological heritage, offering core courses in Foundations of Theology, Christology and Trinity, Christian Morality, Scripture, and Liturgy and Sacraments.

Each program then focuses on concentration courses to build professional experience. The experiential programs of Catholic Educational Leadership, Pastoral Studies, and Religious Education then end with a field-based experience which aims to blend theological knowledge with professional experience.

These degrees serve the fields of education, social services, healthcare and other forms of chaplaincy are part of the mission of the Church, which are foundational to much of the social, educational, and healthcare infrastructure of our province and nation.

Specializations and degree options

We offer specialized graduate programs in four distinct areas. Students can complete a graduate certificate of 15 credits, a graduate diploma of 24 or 27 credits, or a master's degree of 39-42 credits. Each master's degree requires the completion of core and concentration courses, culminating in a field-based learning experience, research paper, or a thesis.

Catholic Educational Leadership

Attain a critical and constructive understanding of responsible and ethical leadership in educational organizations, to be exercised in the light of faith and the Church. Learn More.

Pastoral Studies

Prepare for ministry, learn to integrate theology with ministry practice, and help foster spiritual lives. Learn More.

Religious Education

Equip yourself with a deeper understanding of Catholic theology, greater competence in the teaching of religion, stronger leadership in religious education programs, and an enriched spiritual life. Learn More.

Theological Studies

Develop a theological foundation that is faithful to the Catholic tradition, sensitive to beliefs of other faith traditions, and aware of the contemporary culture. Learn More.

Graduate Program Specializations


We offer specialized graduate programs in four distinct areas. Typically, these programs require completion of 15–39 credits of core and degree-specific courses, as well as a capstone course or thesis. Students graduate with either a Graduate Certificate, Diploma or Master’s Degree.

Catholic Educational Leadership

Attain a critical and constructive understanding of responsible and ethical leadership in educational organizations, to be exercised in the light of faith and the Church. Learn More.

Pastoral Studies

Prepare for ministry, learn to integrate theology with ministry practice, and help foster reinvigorated spiritual lives. Learn More.

Religious Education

Equip yourself with a deeper understanding of Catholic theology, greater competence in the teaching of religion, stronger leadership in religious education programs, and an enriched spiritual life. Learn More.

Theological Studies

Develop a theological foundation that is faithful to the Catholic tradition, sensitive to beliefs of other faith traditions, and aware of the contemporary culture. Learn More.


Degree Framework


There is no breadth requirement for BA students at St. Mark’s College. Students must, however, keep in mind that upper-level courses (i.e. courses with 300 and 400 numbers) have prerequisites.

First and Second Year

54-60 credits inclusive of the the following 100- and 200-level course requirements specific for the BA degree. Specific pre-requisites are required for entry to 300 and 400 level courses. 

English (12 credits)


       6 credits of first year English
       6 credits of second year English/Literature

Religion (9 credits)


Philosophy (9 credits)


History (12 credits)

       6 credits history courses must be Canadian Content

Geography (6 credits)


Social Sciences (6 credits)


Lab Requirement (3 credits)


Third and Fourth Year

Catholic Theological Studies (21 credits)

Theology: Religious Education

    RLED 410: Philosophy of Catholic Education

Theology:

    THEO 451: Biblical Studies
    THEO 402: God, Christ, Church

Theology: History

    HIST 425: Church History

Theology: Education

    EDUC 410: Issues in Religion and Curriculum
    EDUC 420: Foundations of Catholic Education in Canada
    EDUC 430: Curriculum & Instruction/Pre-Practicum

English (24 credits)

English Language (6 cr):

    ENGL 312: History of the English Language (6 credits)

English Literature pre-1900 (6cr - choose 2 courses):

    ENGL 316: Chaucer and the Middle Ages
    ENGL 318: Old English Beowolf in Translation
    ENGL 448: Shakespeare, Genre, and Religion

English Literature post-1900 (6cr):

    ENGL 415 Children’s Literature After 1900
    ENGL 417: Studies in Contemporary Canadian Aboriginal Literature

English (6cr - choose 2):

    ENGL 319: English Renaissance and Reformation Literature
    ENGL 419: Faith, Science, and Culture in Victorian Literature
    ENGL 420: Darwin and the Victorians
    ENGL 421: Tragedy & Film

History (18 credits)

Canadian History:

    HIST 301:British Columbia (6 cr)

European History:

    HIST 311: Britain and European Relations 1750 – 1850
    HIST 312: Britain and European Relations 1850 – 1918
    HIST 313: Britain and European Relations 1945 – present

History of ANY region other than Canada or Europe:

    HIST 401: Modern East Asia
    HIST 425: Church History (This course can be counted as either a Theology OR a History credit)

Transfer students wishing to enter 300- or 400-level courses who do not have the exact prerequisites outlined above will be asked to demonstrate to the Dean that they have the necessary pre-knowledge to be successful in the course they wish to take. If they do not, they may be asked to take any prerequisites deemed necessary by the Dean.


Permanent Diaconate

The formation program of diaconal candidates rests on four pillars: theological, human, spiritual, and pastoral

THEOLOGICAL formation

St. Mark's College provides the theological formation for those studying for the permanent diaconate in the Archdiocese of Vancouver. Candidates are placed in one of two streams, graduate diploma and non-graduate diploma, based on their previous education. 


In 2012, the first group of diaconal candidates started academic studies at St. Mark’s, which the Archbishop asked to partner with the Archdiocese to provide an “intensive theological formation that prepares the candidates for ministry and will also nourish their spiritual life.”

Human, Spiritual and Pastoral formation

Human formation refers to the development of skills that help candidates relate to and work with the diverse people of God.

Spiritual formation consists of retreats, study days, spiritual direction, and commitment to the public prayer of the Church, the Liturgy of the Hours.

Pastoral formation brings together all components into supervised fieldwork that targets the needs of the candidate: homiletics, catechesis, liturgical ministry, work in social service agencies, hospital and prison visits, guidance of parish groups, volunteers and movements. Formation takes place on evenings and weekends.





Undergraduate Courses


Below is a list of the 300 and 400 level courses you can take with St. Mark's College. The Bachelor of Arts in Theology and Culture has required courses as well as the opportunity for some electives.

Students in first and second year are cross-enrolled at Corpus Christi College for 100 and 200 level courses. These courses are viewable on the Corpus Christi College course listing webpage.

Senior (300 and 400) Level BA in Theology and Culture courses

Course Descriptions


Our Courses

St. Mark’s College offers graduate Certificates & Diplomas in Theological Studies, Religious Education, Pastoral Studies, and Catholic Educational Leadership. Students can apply to the program in one of these areas.

St. Mark’s College offers graduate Certificates & Diplomas in Theological Studies, Religious Education, Pastoral Studies, and Catholic Educational Leadership. Students can apply to the program in one of these areas.

St. Mark’s College offers graduate Certificates & Diplomas in Theological Studies, Religious Education, Pastoral Studies, and Catholic Educational Leadership. Students can apply to the program in one of these areas.

St. Mark’s College offers graduate Certificates & Diplomas in Theological Studies, Religious Education, Pastoral Studies, and Catholic Educational Leadership. Students can apply to the program in one of these areas.

St. Mark’s College offers graduate Certificates & Diplomas in Theological Studies, Religious Education, Pastoral Studies, and Catholic Educational Leadership. Students can apply to the program in one of these areas.

St. Mark’s College offers graduate Certificates & Diplomas in Theological Studies, Religious Education, Pastoral Studies, and Catholic Educational Leadership. Students can apply to the program in one of these areas.

St. Mark’s College offers graduate Certificates & Diplomas in Theological Studies, Religious Education, Pastoral Studies, and Catholic Educational Leadership. Students can apply to the program in one of these areas.

St. Mark’s College offers graduate Certificates & Diplomas in Theological Studies, Religious Education, Pastoral Studies, and Catholic Educational Leadership. Students can apply to the program in one of these areas.

Catholic Educational Leadership

Develop organizational skills and management skills, to be exercised in the light of faith and the Church.

This program is designed for the preparation of administrators in Catholic schools. The program combines reflection on the Catholic theological tradition with leadership theory and practice in the context of Catholic educational ministry.

Build towards a Master's degree. Credits earned at one level can count towards requirements of a higher level program. Students can start with a Graduate Certificate, build to a Graduate Diploma and then to a Master's degree.

  • Master in Catholic Educational Leadership (39 credits)


    Program Goals

    This program is designed to:
    (1)    foster a deeper understanding and integration of Catholic theology and its connection to Catholic educational leadership;
    (2)    develop the knowledge and skills required for effective educational leadership in Catholic schools;
    (3)    encourage growth in personal and spiritual maturity. 

    CORE COURSES (15 credits)

    PHIL 501: Philosophical themes in Catholic Theology
    THEO 501: Foundations of Theology
    SCRI 505: Introduction to Scripture
    THEO 530: Christian Morality
    THEO 551: Ecclesiology of Vatican II

    CONCENTRATION COURSES (18 credits)

    THEO 525: Theology of Ministry

    And five of the following courses:
    CALR 520: Administration and Leadership in Catholic Schools
    CALR 521: Catholic Educational Institution
    CALR 526: Curriculum, Assessment and Evaluation in Catholic Schools
    CALR 528: Current Issues in Catholic Education
    CALR 510: Leadership and Aims of Catholic Education
    SPIR 537: Leadership and Spirituality

    ELECTIVE (3 credits)

    Any 500-level SMC course

    Note: Students can take an elective course with the other Theological Colleges, with approval from the Dean of Theology.
     

    RESEARCH METHODS (no credits)

    MTHD: Basic Research Skills Modules


    CAPSTONE (3 credits)

    CALR 600: Field-Based Learning Project


    Learning Outcomes

    Students who have successfully completed this program:
    • Students demonstrate an ability to conduct informed biblical interpretation within the Catholic tradition and will demonstrate an understanding of the Church’s teaching and practice from historical, doctrinal, and systematic perspectives;
    • Students demonstrate a thorough understanding of the principles of Catholic educational leadership and develop pastoral skills essential to their application in diverse contexts;
    • Students demonstrate capacities for theory-praxis integration and for theological reflection in the context of Catholic educational leadership.


  • Graduate Certificate in Catholic Educational Leadership (15 credits)


    The Graduate Certificate programs consist of 15 credits of core, elective and certificate specific course work.

    9 Credits of the Core Courses
    6 Credits from Concentration Courses (choose 2 courses)

    CORE COURSES (9 Credits)

    THEO 501: Foundations of Theology
    THEO 530: Christian Morality
    SCRI 505: Introduction to Scripture

    CONCENTRATION COURSES (6 Credits)

    THEO 525: Theology of Ministry
    CALR 520: Administration and Leadership in Catholic schools
    CALR 521: Catholic Educational Institution
    CALR 526: Curriculum, Assessment and Evaluation in Catholic schools
    CALR 528: Current Issues in Catholic Education
    CALR 510: Leadership and Aims of Catholic Education
    SPIR 537: Leadership and Spirituality

  • Catholic Core (9 credits)


    Catholic Core

    Strengthen your personal faith understanding by starting with our core programming.

    Credits can later be applied to a Graduate Certificate, Diploma, or Master’s Degree, based on eligibility requirements. Learn more


View upcoming courses

Pastoral Studies

Discover your gifts and develop them for service.

This program is a professional degree program which provides education for the Church’s mission and ministry in the world. Providing the opportunity for an integration of theology and the practice of ministry, students will become more intentional about their ministerial experiences. 

Build towards a Master's degree. Credits earned at one level can count towards requirements of a higher level program. Students can start with a Graduate Certificate, build to a Graduate Diploma and then to a Master's degree.

  • Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies (42 credits)



    Program Goals

    This program is designed to:
    (1)    foster a deeper understanding and integration of Catholic theology and its connection to pastoral ministry; 
    (2)    develop the knowledge and skills required for effective pastoral ministry in contemporary contexts;
    (3)    encourage growth in personal and spiritual maturity.

    CORE COURSES (24 credits)

    PHIL 501: Philosophical Themes in Catholic Theology
    THEO 501: Foundations of Theology
    SCRI 500: Introduction to the Old Testament*
    SCRI 510: Introduction to the New Testament*
    THEO 510: Christology and Trinity
    THEO 530: Christian Morality
    THEO 540: Liturgy and Sacraments
    THEO 551: Ecclesiology of Vatican II

    * SCRI 505: Introduction to Scripture + SCRI 516: Johannine Literature, SCRI 521: St. Paul’s Epistles, SCRI 532: Torah, or others could replace SCRI 500 + SCRI 510


    CONCENTRATION COURSES (12 credits)

    THEO 525: Theology of Ministry
    PAST 501: Pastoral Ministry: The Other
    THEO 570: Canon Law for Ministry

    Plus one of the following courses:
    PAST 510: Pastoral Ministry: Self
    RLED 514: Theories of Religious Development
    THEO 560: Christian Anthropology
    SPIR 537: Leadership and Spirituality

    ELECTIVE (3 credits)

    Any 500-level SMC course

    Note: Students can take an elective course with the other Theological Colleges, with approval from the Dean of Theology.

    RESEARCH METHODS (no credits)

    MTHD: Basic Research Skills Modules

    CAPSTONE (3 credits)

    PAST 600: Field-Based Learning Project


    Learning Outcomes
    Students who have successfully completed this program:

    • Students demonstrate an ability to conduct informed biblical interpretation within the Catholic tradition and will demonstrate an understanding of the church’s teaching and practice from historical, doctrinal and systematic perspectives;
    • Students demonstrate knowledge of pastoral theology and  its cognate disciplines and develop pastoral skills essential to its application in diverse contexts;
    • Students demonstrate capacities for theory-praxis integration and for theological reflection in the context of their chosen area of ministry.





  • Graduate Diploma in Pastoral Studies (24 credits)


    The Graduate Diploma programs consist of 24 credits of core and diploma specific course work.

    12 Credits from the Core Courses (*including required)
    12 Credits of Concentration Courses

    CORE COURSES (12 Credits)

    Choose 12 credits including * required courses

    PHIL 501: Philosophical Themes in Catholic Theology
    THEO 551: Ecclesiology of Vatican II
    THEO 501: Foundations of Theology *
    THEO 510: Christology – Trinity
    THEO 530: Christian Morality *
    THEO 540: Liturgy and Sacraments
    SCRI 500: Introduction to the Old Testament*
    SCRI 510: Introduction to the New Testament*

    SCRI 505: Introduction to Scripture + SCRI 516: Johannine Literature, SCRI 521: St. Paul’s Epistles, SCRI 532: Torah, or others could replace SCRI 500 + SCRI 510


    CONCENTRATION COURSES (12 Credits)

    THEO 525: Theology of Ministry
    PAST 501: Pastoral Ministry: The Other
    THEO 570: Canon Law for Ministry

    Plus one of the following courses:
    PAST 510: Pastoral Ministry: Self
    RLED 514: Theories of Religious Development
    THEO 560: Christian Anthropology
    SPIR 537: Leadership and Spirituality


  • Graduate Certificate in Pastoral Studies (15 credits)


    The Graduate Certificate programs consist of 15 credits of core, elective and certificate specific course work.

    9 Credits of the Core Courses
    6 Credits from Concentration Courses

    CORE COURSES (9 Credits)

    THEO 501: Foundations of Theology
    THEO 530: Christian Morality
    SCRI 505: Introduction to Scripture

    CONCENTRATION COURSES (6 Credits)

    THEO 525: Theology of Ministry
    PAST 501: Pastoral Ministry: The Other
    PAST 510: Pastoral Ministry: Self
    RLED 514: Theories of Religious Development
    THEO 560: Christian Anthropology 
    THEO 570: Canon Law for Ministry
    SPIR 537: Leadership and Spirituality

  • Catholic Core (9 credits)


    Catholic Core

    Strengthen your personal faith understanding by starting with our core programming.
    Credits can later be applied to a Graduate Certificate or Master’s Degree, based on eligibility requirements. Learn more


View upcoming courses





Theological Studies

Develop a theological foundation that is faithful to the Catholic tradition, sensitive to beliefs of other faith traditions, and aware of the contemporary culture.


This program aims to deepen the religious basis of an individual’s life and work. It offers a broad study of the major areas of Catholic theology and it provides an opportunity for in-depth study and specialization. Designed to provide a deeper academic, critical and intellectual understanding of Catholic theology, as well as to cultivate a sense of vocation and committed appreciation and scholarly understanding of the Catholic Intellectual Tradition, students will be able to integrate their academic studies with their spiritual lives and personal growth.

Build towards a Master's degree. Credits earned at one level can count towards requirements of a higher level program. Students can start with a Graduate Certificate, build to a Graduate Diploma and then to a Master's degree.

  • Master of Arts (Theological Studies) (42 credits)


    Program Goals

    This program is designed to:
    (1)    Cultivate survey knowledge and integration of the Catholic theological tradition and its application in diverse contexts;
    (2)    enable students to think theologically by considering different theological areas, perspectives, and methods;
    (3)    provide an opportunity for students to conduct specialized research in a particular area of interest.

    CORE COURSES (24 credits)

    PHIL 501: Philosophical Themes in Catholic Theology
    THEO 501: Foundations of Theology
    SCRI 500: Introduction to the Old Testament*
    SCRI 510: Introduction to the New Testament*
    THEO 510: Christology and Trinity
    THEO 530: Christian Morality
    THEO 540: Liturgy and Sacraments
    THEO 551: Ecclesiology of Vatican II

    SCRI 505: Introduction to Scripture + SCRI 516: Johannine Literature, SCRI 521: St. Paul’s Epistles, SCRI 532: Torah, or others could replace SCRI 500 + SCRI 510


    CONCENTRATION COURSES (12 credits)

    HIST 505: History of the Church
    THEO 522: Catholic Social Teachings
    THEO 560: Christian Anthropology
    THEO 570: Canon Law for Ministry

    ELECTIVE (3 credits)

    Any 500-level course

    RESEARCH METHODS (no credits)

    MTHD: Basic Research Skills Modules

    MAJOR PAPER (3 or 6 credits)

    THEO 602: Major Paper (3 credits) or
    THESIS: Thesis Writing (6 credits. 3 in lieu of an elective)


    Learning Outcomes

    Students who have successfully completed this program:
    • Students are able to conduct responsible biblical interpretation within the Catholic tradition and demonstrate an understanding of the church’s teaching and practice from historical, doctrinal, and systematic perspectives and its relevance for contemporary Christian living.







  • Graduate Diploma (Theological Studies) (24 credits)


    The Graduate Diploma programs consist of 24 credits of core and diploma specific course work.

    12 Credits from the Core Courses (*including required)
    12 Credits of Concentration Courses

    CORE COURSES (12 Credits)

    Choose 12 credits including * required courses

    PHIL 501: Philosophical Themes in Catholic Theology
    THEO 551: Ecclesiology of Vatican II
    THEO 501: Foundations of Theology *
    THEO 510: Christology – Trinity
    THEO 530: Christian Morality *
    THEO 540: Liturgy and Sacraments
    SCRI  500: Introduction to the Old Testament*
    SCRI  510: Introduction to the New Testament*

    SCRI 505: Introduction to Scripture + SCRI 516: Johannine Literature, SCRI 521: St. Paul’s Epistles, SCRI 532: Torah, or others could replace SCRI 500 + SCRI 510


    CONCENTRATION COURSES (12 Credits)

    HIST 505: History of the Church
    THEO 522: Catholic Social Teachings
    THEO 560: Christian Anthropology
    THEO 570: Canon Law for Ministry



  • Graduate Certificate (Theological Studies) (15 credits)


    The Graduate Certificate programs consist of 15 credits of core, elective and certificate specific course work.

    9 Credits of the Core Courses
    6 Credits from Concentration Courses

    CORE COURSES (9 Credits)

    THEO 501: Foundations of Theology
    THEO 530: Christian Morality
    SCRI 505: Introduction to Scripture

    CONCENTRATION COURSES (6 Credits)

    HIST 505: History of the Church
    THEO 522: Catholic Social Teachings
    THEO 560: Christian Anthropology
    THEO 570: Canon Law for Ministry


     

  • Catholic Core (9 credits)



    Catholic Core

    Strengthen your personal faith understanding by starting with our core programming.

    Credits can later be applied to a Graduate Certificate or Master’s Degree, based on eligibility requirements. Learn more.  


View upcoming courses

Religious Education

Equip yourself with a deeper understanding of Catholic theology, greater competence in the teaching of religion, stronger leadership in religious education programs, and an enriched spiritual life.


This program is designed for the preparation of teachers of religious education, both in Catholic schools and in parishes. Combining knowledge of theology with educational theory and practice, this program introduces students to the Catholic theological tradition and to the skills essential for teaching the faith in a variety of contexts.

Build towards a Master's degree. Credits earned at one level can count towards requirements of a higher level program. Students can start with a Graduate Certificate, build to a Graduate Diploma and then to a Master's degree.

  • Master of Arts in Religious Education (42 credits)


    Program Goals

    This program is designed to:
    (1)    foster a deeper understanding and integration of Catholic theology and its connection to educational ministry;
    (2)    develop the knowledge and pastoral skills required for effective educational ministry in contemporary contexts;
    (3)    encourage growth in personal and spiritual maturity.

    CORE COURSES (27 credits)

    PHIL 501: Philosophical Themes in Catholic Theology
    THEO 501: Foundations of Theology
    SCRI 500: Introduction to the Old Testament*
    SCRI 510: Introduction to the New Testament*
    THEO 510: Christology and Trinity
    THEO 530: Christian Morality
    THEO 540: Liturgy and Sacraments
    THEO 551: Ecclesiology of Vatican II
    HIST 505: History of the Church

    SCRI 505: Introduction to Scripture + SCRI 516: Johannine Literature, SCRI 521: St. Paul’s Epistles, SCRI 532: Torah, or others could replace SCRI 500 + SCRI 510


    CONCENTRATION COURSES (9 credits)

    THEO 525: Theology of Ministry

    Plus two of the following courses:
    RLED 512: Catechetics
    RLED 514: Theories of Religious Development
    CALR 526: Curriculum, Assessment and Evaluation in Catholic schools
    CALR 510: Leadership and Aims of Catholic Education
    SPIR 537: Leadership and Spirituality

    ELECTIVE (3 credits)

    Any 500-level SMC course

    Note: Students can take an elective course with the other Theological Colleges, with approval from the Dean of Theology.

    RESEARCH METHODS (no credits)

    MTHD: Basic Research Skills Modules

    CAPSTONE (3 credits)

    RLED 600: Field-Based Learning Project


    Learning Outcomes
    Students who have successfully completed this program:
    • Students demonstrate an ability to conduct informed biblical interpretation within the Catholic tradition, and demonstrate an understanding of the Church’s teaching and practice from historical, doctrinal and systematic perspectives;
    • Students demonstrate a thorough understanding of the principles of Catholic education and develop pastoral skills essential to their application in diverse contexts;
    • Students demonstrate capacities for theory-praxis integration and for theological reflection in the context of educational ministry.





  • Graduate Diploma in Religious Education (24 credits)


    The Graduate Diploma programs consist of 24 credits of core, elective and diploma specific course work.

    12 Credits from the Core Courses (*including required)
    9 Credits of Concentration Courses
    3 Credits Elective (any 500 level course)
     

    CORE COURSES (12 Credits)

    Choose 12 credits including * required courses

    PHIL 501: Philosophical Themes in Catholic Theology
    THEO 551: Ecclesiology of Vatican II
    THEO 501: Foundations of Theology *
    THEO 510: Christology – Trinity
    THEO 530: Christian Morality *
    THEO 540: Liturgy and Sacraments
    HIST 505: History of the Church
    SCRI 500: Introduction to the Old Testament*
    SCRI 510: Introduction to the New Testament*

    SCRI 505: Introduction to Scripture + SCRI 516: Johannine Literature, SCRI 521: St. Paul’s Epistles, SCRI 532: Torah, or others could replace SCRI 500 + SCRI 510 


    CONCENTRATION COURSES (9 Credits)

    THEO 525: Theology of Ministry 

    Plus two of the following courses:
    RLED 512: Catechetics
    RLED 514: Theories of Religious Development
    CALR 526: Curriculum, Assessment & Evaluation in Catholic Schools
    CALR 510: Leadership and Aims of Catholic Education
    SPIR 537: Leadership and Spirituality 

    ELECTIVE COURSE (3 credits)

    any 500 level SMC course

  • Graduate Certificate in Religious Education (15 credits)


    The Graduate Certificate programs consist of 15 credits of core and certificate specific course work.

    9 Credits of the Core Courses
    6 Credits from Concentration Courses

    CORE COURSES (9 Credits)

    THEO 501: Foundations of Theology
    THEO 530: Christian Morality
    SCRI 505: Introduction to Scripture

    CONCENTRATION COURSES (6 Credits)

    THEO 525: Theology of Ministry
    CALR 526: Curriculum, Assessment & Evaluation in Catholic Schools
    CALR 510: Leadership and Aims of Catholic Education
    RLED 512: Catechetics
    RLED 514: Theories of Religious Development
    SPIR 537: Leadership and Spirituality


  • Catholic Core (9 credits)


    Catholic Core

    Strengthen your personal faith understanding by starting with our core programming. Credits can later be applied to a Graduate Certificate or Master’s Degree, based on eligibility requirements. Learn more


View upcoming courses



Catholic Core

Strengthen your personal faith understanding by starting with our core programming. Credits can later be applied to a Graduate Certificate, Diploma or Master’s Degree.

Teachers from CISVA and Congregational schools within the Archdiocese of Vancouver are eligible for the Archbishop’s Scholarship for Leadership in Catholic Education which will reimburse successful applicants their tuition fees upon completion of the Catholic Core courses.

Courses in theology, Christian morality and scripture provide core knowledge to deepen the religious basis of your life and work.

Program Pathways

Begin with the three Catholic Core courses, and build towards a Graduate Certificate and then to a Master’s degree. Credits earned at one level can count towards requirements of a higher level program.

After the three Catholic Core courses, take two more courses and receive a Graduate Certificate of 15 credits. Continue on to receive a Graduate Diploma of 24 credits, or a Master's degree of 39-42 credits.

Catholic Core Courses

Foundations of Theology (THEO 501)

Examine the importance of theology for the church and engage with aspects of moral and pastoral concern. This introductory course explores a variety of interrelated themes in theological method and reflection from a Catholic perspective, including: the nature of revelation, faith, tradition and theology; the relationship between faith and reason; the mediation of revelation in scripture, liturgy and the dogmatic traditions of the Church; and the nature and role of the magisterium, infallibility, the development of doctrine, and the sensus fidei.

  “As a Catholic educator seeking exposure to the work of Catholic theologians as a means of deepening my understanding of my faith, Theology 501 exceeded my expectations in almost every way. I came away from this course humbled by the incredible depth of intellectual understanding present in Catholic theology. I also appreciated the effectively curated content of the assigned readings, whose language I found to be quite accessible, as well as the logical flow of topics (faith & revelation, tradition & scripture and magisterial authority) that expanded on these pieces. For those looking for a faith formation opportunity or just to expand their knowledge about Catholicism, I highly recommend this course!”  

- Robert Kirkham, Educator 
 

Christian Morality (THEO 530)

Explore the sources, development, and history of moral theology. Particular attention is given to the “foundational” moral theology of the Catholic tradition and the call of the Second Vatican Council for renewal of this discipline.

Introduction to Scripture (SCRI 505)

Discover a basic introduction to Scripture for students without previous background in Scripture. This course covers both the Old and New Testaments in their own contexts, thematic parallels between them, and gives attention to how the Catholic intellectual tradition engages these textual traditions.

Upcoming Course Dates

In addition to the regular course offerings, there will always be a Catholic Core course offered in the summer and there will always be another Catholic Core course offered virtually during the regular school year.

Winter 2021

THEO 501: Foundations of Theology (Dr. Nicholas Olkovich) 

January - March
Thursdays,  6:00 – 9:00pm (virtual)

Summer 1 2021

SCRI 505: Introduction to Scripture (Fr. Nick Meisl) 

April-June
Wednesdays, 6:00pm – 9:00pm (virtual) 

Summer 2 2021

THEO 530: Christian Morality (Dr. Carolyn Roeber, OP)

July 5-23, 2021 - with coursework to be completed by late August
Monday, Wednesday, and Fridays, 9:00am - 1:00pm


"Deciding to take the Catholic Core Courses at St. Mark’s College, particularly during Covid-19, has been one of the smartest decisions of my life. At first, I felt some trepidation as I last undertook an academic course 9 years ago; however, the entire experience has been so positive and enlightening, I am delighted I did and would definitely encourage others to undertake them as well. The learning environment is very collegial and supportive; in our classes, our contributions were always valued, not only by the professors, but also by our classmates. It is a wonderful way of learning from each other and forming new relationships. My teaching ministry will definitely be informed by my study at SMC: I am actually looking forward to sharing what I have learned with my students and colleagues. My faith life and appreciation of the liturgy has benefitted, too, from these studies on Scripture and Theology and the readings we have done in class; my choice of bedtime reading material now isn’t novels but the Bible and Apostolic Exhortations! Every Christian Education teacher should take the Catholic Core at SMC - it’s a great place to learn! "

- Ann Marie McGrath, Educator


Questions?

Email Dr. Lynda Robitaille, Dean of Theology

We look forward to seeing you at St. Mark's College!








school Graduate Programs
Catholic Core

Read about students who completed the Catholic Core

Scholarships

Archbishop's Scholarship for Leadership in Catholic Education

The Archbishop’s Scholarship for Leadership in Catholic Education has been set up by the Archdiocese and Catholic Independent Schools of the Vancouver Archdiocese (CISVA) to foster the pursuit of Catholic higher education for teachers within CISVA schools who have demonstrated or have the potential for leadership within CISVA.

The Scholarship is open to all TRB certified teachers at a Catholic school in the Archdiocese of Vancouver, as well as Education Assistants, Principals, and Vice-Principals. This includes Congregational schools as well.

Scholarship

The Archbishop’s Scholarship will reimburse successful applicants their tuition fees, currently $1,110 per course, upon completion of each of three designated courses: Foundations of Theology (THEO 501), Christian Morality (THEO 530), and Introduction to Scripture (SCRI 505), known as the Catholic Core.

Application

 launchStart my application
Upon completing this application, your information will be sent to CISVA for scholarship approval. If you receive the scholarship, St. Mark's will contact you with course registration information. 

CISVA FAQ

Frequently asked questions from CISVA applicants can be found on the CISVA scholarship webpage.

Past Events

Public Lectures

"Advocacy and the Promotion of Social Justice" Fr. Jebamalai Stanislaus, SJ

"The Liberal Arts in the 21st Century: More Important than Ever" Professor Santa J. Ono, President of the University of British Columbia

"Bridging Borders: Finding Hope in Syria" Father Nawras Sammour, SJ, Regional Director of Jesuit Refugee Services

"Preaching and Communicating in a Franciscan Era: What is the Church learning from an Argentine, Jesuit Pope?" Father Thomas Rosica, C.S.B., CEO of Salt and Light Media

"Speaking about God: Mercy Matters" Dr. Janet Soskice, Catholic Philosopher and President of Jesus College, Cambridge

"Why Do We Look Up at the Heavens?" Br. Guy Consolmagno, SJ, Director of the Vatican Observatory

"Faith and Society" Dr. Angus Reid, Chairman if the Angus Reid Institute, Canada's best-known and longest practicing pollster

"The Catholic Church as a Church of (the) Reformation" Dr. Hilmar Pabel, Professor of History at Simon Fraser University

"Past, Present, Future: Reflections from a Second Vatican Council Father" Bishop Remi J. De Roo, the last surviving bishop to have participated in all four Vatican II sessions

"Laudato Si' After Paris, COP 21: Our Mission for a Healthy Planet" Reverend Dr. Robert Allore, SJ, and Joyce Murray, MP

"Pius XII and the Jews: Problems of Memory and Moral Judgment in History" Dr. Robert Ventresca, author of the award-winning "Soldier of Christ: The Life of Pope Pius XII"

Centre for Christian Engagement

"Our Dream Soars Higher: Pope Francis’ Call to Civic and Political Love" Dr. Steven P. Millies

A Toolkit for Spiritual Survival

The Role of the Laity in the Reform of the Church: A modest but urgent proposal


Community Events

Mass of the Holy Spirit
Lenten Liturgy and Lunch 2019: Fill Your Bowl with Hope

Young People and the Church: A Conversation

Film screening: In the Spirit of Reconciliation

Liturgy and Lunch 2018: Fill Your Bowl with Joy
University Mass
Liturgy and Lunch 2017: Fill Your Bowl with Life


Development Events

19th Annual Fundraising Breakfast
Dinner at the Gallery
18th Annual Fundraising Breakfast

Fr. David Bauer Memorial Golf Classic

Ambrose and Matilda's 5th Annual Fundraising Dinner Concert

Dinner on the Drive: Molto Italiano 


Continuing Education Events

Alzheimer Café and Dementia Care with Dr. Gemma Jones
Permanent Diaconate in 3 Inspiring Sessions
"Do Monkey's Go to Heaven?" Book Launch, Fr. John McCarthy, SJ
Painting A Thousand Words
Late to Love: Soul music for the soul, St. Augustine style
Catholic Philosophy for the Rest of Us: Applying Principles to Everyday Life
Spiritual Growth: Why and How?
Saints and Mystics Through the Ages: A Lens Into Our Own Lives?
The Feminine Genius, Mary, and Men
Atheism, Doubt, and the Search for God


Custom Courses

Our professional and faith development courses can be customized to suit the needs of your school, parish, or other organization.

Flexible delivery models and a variety of themes in religion, faith formation, and professional development are available.

Topics include:

•    Philosophy of Education
•    Catholic Intellectual Tradition (and how CIT relates to what is being taught)
•    New Curriculum
•    Spirituality
•    Scripture
•    Canon Law
•    Ethics
•    Morality
•    Prayer
•    Church History
•    Patristics (Early Christian Fathers)
•    Saints
•    Popes and Papal Teachings

Flexible Delivery Models - We can bring our courses to you!

Need more flexibility? Don’t live in the Vancouver area? We offer a variety of flexible course delivery options:
•    On-site: At our campus at UBC, or at your school, parish or another location
•    Online: Learn at your pace, at your place
•    Livestreaming: Live interactive sessions with instructors streamed to directly to your group meeting space

Contact

Contact us at [email protected] or 604.314.9653 to find out more about our current offerings, or to discuss developing a custom course to meet your needs.

Parish Offerings

Are you an active parish? Do your parishioners want to further develop in their faith? St. Mark’s College can offer a variety of Continuing Education programs for lifelong learners.


Flexible delivery models and a variety of themes in religion, faith formation, and professional development are available.

Ask about our custom courses. Designed specifically to meet your needs, a custom course will pair your group with an expert in the requested field. 

Topics include:

•    Philosophy of Education
•    Catholic Intellectual Tradition (and how CIT relates to what is being taught)
•    New Curriculum
•    Spirituality
•    Scripture
•    Canon Law
•    Ethics
•    Morality
•    Prayer
•    Church History
•    Patristics (Early Christian Fathers)
•    Saints
•    Popes and Papal Teachings

Flexible Delivery Models - We can bring our courses to you!

Need more flexibility? Don’t live in the Vancouver area? We offer a variety of flexible course delivery options:
•    On-site: At our campus at UBC, or at your school, parish or another location
•    Online: Learn at your pace, at your place
•    Livestreaming: Live interactive sessions with instructors streamed to directly to your group meeting space

Contact

Contact us at [email protected] or 604.314.9653 to find out more about our current offerings, or to discuss developing a custom course to meet your needs.

Professional Development

Need professional and faith development training for your school, company or community?

Explore our workshops, designed exclusively for St. Mark’s College Continuing Education.

  • Mandarin for Business: language course intensive


    A unique opportunity for students and professionals with little or no experience in Mandarin to learn Business Mandarin at the Beginner level, taught by a veteran Mandarin instructor.

    Business-focused Mandarin language course intensive. Two scheduling options are available: 10 week program or 5 week program.
    Certificates of Completion are awarded to all students who finish the course.

  • Mandarin for Business: Chinese Business Etiquette seminar


    Build your professional portfolio and expand your Asia-Pacific networks with Chinese language basics and knowledge of business culture etiquette.

    Understanding Chinese Business Etiquette seminar

    (1-2 hours)

    This seminar can be completed during an extended lunch period, or after work one day.  Colleagues and extended family members can participate in this workshop and leave with a basic knowledge of business etiquette, which can greatly enhance a business persons’ ability to navigate the often ‘tricky’ waters o
    cross-cultural business negotiations.  This seminar will provide the following:
    • Greetings, both formal and informal
    • The importance of an appropriate gift
    • Body language
    • The dos and don’ts of negotiations
    • Farewells
     

  • New BC Curriculum - Anticipating Assessment in Grades 10-12

     

    What will BC’s Redesigned Curriculum look like in grades 10-12 and how will this influence how teachers assess students?

    Envisioning assessment for Grades 10-12 is a challenge many teachers are facing as targets for graduation are being prepared for the 2017-18 school year. How we assess and evaluate students will determine how we teach students and facilitate their learning. Inquiry and authentic student engagement does not happen with a multiple choice test at the end of the unit or course.

    In order to best serve our students, we need to become the learners to deeply understand the possible shift in pedagogy, curriculum intentions, and assessment of student learning.

    With the understanding that assessment drives instruction, St. Mark's Continuing Education offers a collaborative learning space that is facilitated by an St. Mark's workshop facilitator. This workshop is an opportunity to share, play, and imagine as professional learning in the context of implementing BC’s Redesigned Curriculum.

    Topics to be discussed:

    •    evaluating the learning standards (e.g. curricular competencies & content)
    •    implementing ongoing formative assessment strategies to promote student learning
    •    communicating student learning (e.g. e-portfolios, parent-teacher meetings, report cards, etc.)
    •    supporting students with their self-assessment of the core competencies
    •    establishing a shared understanding of BC’s Curriculum and Provincial Assessments

    This is an excellent opportunity for all teaching staff and school leadership to participate as learners and move the discussion outside current understandings.

    "If BC’s Curriculum intends to include learning opportunities like MakerSpaces, project-based learning, and inquiry... how we assess and evaluate students will determine how we teach students and facilitate their learning.”
    – Christine Younghusband, previous session facilitator

  • Aboriginal Education 101: Understanding the Past to Move Forward


    First Peoples Principles of Learning and the Revised BC Curriculum

    Where have we come from? Where are we now? Where do we want to go? This workshop will help answer the these three questions.

    Participants will examine the history of British Columbia plays a major role in how we introduce the new curriculum into our classrooms. By understanding the true history that has occurred in the province, participants will be able to use strategies to move forward. The First Peoples Principles of Learning will be examined in terms of how we can introduce them into the classroom for all learners.

    Delivery options:

    • 2-hour workshop
    • Combine with other workshops
    • Split over 2 days (for instance, two 1-hour sessions)
    • Evening option available

    Workshop designer: Brad Baker, District Principal, North Vancouver School District

  • Embedding Authentic Aboriginal Authors in the Mainstream Classroom for Secondary Classrooms


    First Peoples Principles of Learning and the Revised BC Curriculum

    The workshop will demonstrate how the First Peoples Principles of Learning along with authentic Indigenous authors were embedded in mainstream English literature units.

    Teachers will have the opportunity to explore and discuss how First Peoples Principles of Learning can be embedded in meaningful and sincere ways both implicitly and explicitly.

    Delivery options:

    • 2-hour workshop
    • Combine with other workshops
    • Split over 2 days (for instance, two 1-hour sessions)
    • Evening option available
    Workshop designer: Brad Baker, District Principal, North Vancouver School District

  • Traditional Oral Story Telling in the Classroom


    First Peoples Principles of Learning and the Revised BC Curriculum

    Teachers will receive authentic resources and strategies to teach traditional oral story telling in the K-7 classroom.

    All activities and strategies meet the new BC Curriculum core competencies. Teachers will be provided with graphic organizers, lesson plans, and activities they can bring back to their students.

    Delivery options:

    • 2-hour workshop
    • Combine with other workshops
    • Split over 2 days (for instance, two 1-hour sessions)
    • Evening option available

    Workshop designer: Brad Baker, District Principal, North Vancouver School District


Contact

Contact us at [email protected] to find out more about our current offerings, or to discuss developing a custom course to meet your needs.


Continuing Education at St. Mark's: Discover. Experience. Act.


Are you a teacher? A St. Mark’s alumnus? An active parishioner? Do you want to develop further in your faith and professional life? St. Mark’s College offers a variety of Continuing Education programs for lifelong learners.

Contact us at [email protected] or 604.314.9653 to find out more about our current offerings, or to discuss developing a custom course to meet your needs.


Flexible Delivery Models - We can bring our courses to you!

Need more flexibility? Don’t live in the Vancouver area? We offer a variety of flexible course delivery options:
  • On-site: At our campus at UBC, or at your school, parish or another location
  • Online: Learn at your pace, at your place
  • Livestreaming: Live interactive sessions with instructors streamed to directly to your group meeting space

Get in touch with us to discuss your needs and our flexible delivery options. Custom courses can be developed.

Current Course Offerings

Discuss your needs and our flexible delivery options.

For personal and professional development:


For schools and educators:


We also develop custom courses for flexible deliver on-site at our campus (at UBC), at your school, online, or via livestream.

Principals: Book professional and faith development sessions for your staff now!

  • Manage your Pro-D fulfillment for the upcoming academic year
  • Reach your school’s professional and faith development targets
  • Customize the format, length and delivery of any topic(s) for your school


Choose themes in religion, faith formation, and professional development.

Topics include:
  • Philosophy of Education
  • Catholic Intellectual Tradition (and how CIT relates to what is being taught)
  • New Curriculum
  • Spirituality
  • Scripture
  • Canon Law
  • Ethics
  • Morality
  • Prayer
  • Church History
  • Patristics (Early Christian Fathers)
  • Saints
  • Popes and Papal Teachings

Ask about our custom courses


  • Sample Course 1: Faith Development - Spirituality: 6 hours across two Friday Pro-D days
  • Sample Course 2: Professional Development - Teaching Scripture: 6 hours taught in 5 sessions (approx. 70 min/session)


Contact

Contact us at [email protected] to find out more about our current offerings, or to discuss developing a custom course to meet your needs.

BA Seminar in Faith Development

Committed to the care and development of the whole person, faith development is the intentional practice of setting aside time to engage in conversations about life, faith, and our own personal relationship with Jesus.

Features of the BA Seminar in Faith Development

Faith Development is for everyone. It is in the very nature of being human to desire to be in relationship with others, and this distinguishes humans from other creatures. Each encounter shapes every person, whether we realize it or not. 

Faith Development is a journey. It takes time. The notion that life itself, or a life of faith, is a journey to a hoped-for purpose or destination is common to many cultures and religious traditions. Faith development, integrates faith-based discussions, reflective exercises, prayer, retreats, and participating in a community, to support every person in answering the question: What is my life's purpose?

The goal is to always grow in relationship with Jesus. The constant truth proclaimed throughout the Christian tradition is that a personal relationship with Jesus is possible. It is through this living relationship in faith that discovering one's individual identity and life's purpose may truly be realized. Who is Jesus to me?

How does it work?

In Fall and Winter terms, students in the BA program gather for four sessions of this inspiring BA Seminar. The mark is a pass/fail, based primarily on attendance and participation. Different themes and questions are introduced for small and large group discussions. These discussions aim to link academic and spiritual growth to focus on the questions of what academic studies have to do with spiritual and life goals.

The faith development program is designed to instruct and support students as they grow in their faith journeys, wherever they may be in that journey.


Teacher track - BA Degree in Theology and Culture

Thinking of a career in teaching? St. Mark’s College at UBC offers a unique Bachelor of Arts Program well-suited for aspiring teachers who want to teach in Catholic, faith-based, or public schools.

Our program is recognized by UBC’s Faculty of Education, which means graduates are eligible to apply to the teacher preparation (BEd) program at UBC. It is also endorsed by Catholic school districts across BC, providing a potential employment advantage for graduates who want to teach in a Catholic school.

insert_drive_fileView 4 year schedule

Program Highlights

  • Complete your studies at St. Mark’s College, right on the UBC campus
  • Earn a BA with teaching concentrations in teachable subjects such as English, History (Socials), and Catholic Studies*
  • Get real teaching experience with internship opportunities (2nd year) plus pre-practicums at local schools (4th year)
  • Be eligible to apply to UBC’s teacher preparation program (BEd)
  • Start on a pathway to teach elementary (K-7), middle school (6-8), or high school (8-12) in Catholic and public schools across the Province
  • Get the edge when applying to teach at a Catholic school
  • Integrate your faith life and academic life

Program Benefits

While many Bachelor’s degrees can qualify you for admittance into a B.Ed program, there are several key advantages to choosing the St. Mark’s BA in Theology and Culture
  • Teach elementary, middle school or high school. Three teachable concentrations in History, English and Catholic Studies* means a wider range of applicable skills
  • A hands-on pre-practicum placement in a lower mainland school gives you valuable teaching experience – before you even start your B.Ed.
  • Our smaller, cohort-style learning environment means you will always have one-on-one support from professors, and a dedicated group of peers to study with
  • Upon completion of your B.A. (St. Mark's College) and B.Ed. (UBC), you will qualify to teach in both Catholic and public schools across BC, opening up more job opportunities



"My decision to attend St. Mark's was based on career opportunities. I love the fact that we interact with students in the Archdiocese of Vancouver through the teaching pre-practicums at local schools. I would recommend this program to anyone who is interested in teaching...or in a comprehensive education in the humanities, which has the potential to lead to so many other fields."

– Alexandra Glinsbockel, Corpus Christi Alumna and St. Mark’s College BA Alumna


Learn on the UBC campus

As a St. Mark’s student, you will enjoy state-of-the-art learning facilities on the UBC campus with some classes in the newly updated Vancouver School of Theology (VST) building. Close to St. Mark's College, UBC’s bus loop and major campus facilities, the VST building boasts smartboards, bright and comfortable study spaces, and a dynamic student population.

Enjoy a vibrant community

St. Mark’s College campus is steps from the VST building. As a student, you will benefit from our active Campus Life and Ministry Office, and have full access to research materials at the John Micallef Library, our brand-new computer lab and printers, and much more.

At the heart of our community is the St. Mark’s Parish, where liturgical services are offered throughout the week. The Pastoral team provides numerous opportunities for spiritual formation, service learning, and one-on-one guidance.

Take advantage of UBC amenities

As a St. Mark’s student, you are also an affiliated UBC student, giving you direct access to a myriad of UBC clubs, amenities, academic resources and wellness services.

Graduation and teaching

Upon graduation from St. Mark’s, you will be eligible to apply for UBC’s Education program with three teaching concentrations: History and English, as well as Catholic Studies*. With internship experience at an elementary and/or high school setting already completed, your application will stand out.

Following graduation from UBC, you will be eligible to work in public and private schools. However, with your third teachable concentration in Catholic Studies, you will also have a distinct advantage over competing applicants for teaching positions in Catholic schools.

Endorsements





"For those who are specifically interested in teaching in Catholic schools, St. Mark's is now the place for them. St. Mark's is the only school in this province offering the third concentration – Catholic Studies. Students who complete our program can also teach at public schools, but they will likely have an edge and an advantage."

– Gabriel Pillay, Dean of Students, Corpus Christi College



“Sixty-five per cent of independent schools in British Columbia are faith-based, which means that, in addition to the certified curriculum, they also teach faith values to students. A Bachelor of Arts program that prepares prospective teachers on how to integrate their faith values in the classroom will enable Catholic schools to better prepare students for life by following the example that Jesus set for us all.”

– Peter Froese, Director of the Federation of Independent Schools of BC (FISA)




Contact

Need help with your application? Contact a St. Mark's College Recruiter to review your course history and eligibility. Schools need good teachers - make an appointment now!

Email: [email protected]
Phone: 604.314.9617

*Catholic Studies is not a provincially recognized teaching concentration; however, it is recognized by the Catholic Independent Schools of the Vancouver Archdiocese (CISVA) and recognized throughout the Catholic school districts of British Columbia.

Spiritual Formation Program

Rooted in the Catholic faith and committed to the intellectual and spiritual growth of every person, the spiritual formation program at St. Mark’s College provides opportunities for students to learn and engage in the rich spiritual traditions of our faith, Catholic social teaching, liturgy, and devotional prayer. Spiritual formation is an integral component of every academic program at St. Mark’s College.

On the Saturdays when class is scheduled, students and professors gather for a communal lunch followed by a mini-retreat spiritual formation session in the chapel before returning to classes in the afternoon.  The Saturday program is designed to help students, faculty and staff harmonize head knowledge with heart knowledge, integrating academic learning with lived faith experiences.  The program is grounded in scripture and offers various ways of encountering God and discerning God’s will for us, individually and communally.

The spiritual formation program teaches individuals how to foster a personal relationship with Jesus. The content is enriching personally and yet mission-oriented, suitable for principals to share with staff, educators to teach students, and ministerial leaders to guide parishioners.

The Campus Ministry team at St. Mark’s College includes ordained (Jesuits) and lay persons who accompany individuals on their spiritual journeys.  The Jesuit parish on campus enriches the spiritual formation program which is grounded in the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits. Explore current Spiritual Formation topics.











Auditing Our Courses

Many of our credit courses can be taken as audit courses. Auditing a course allows a a student to take a class without the benefit of a grade or credit for a course. Students who audit a course do so for the purposes of self-enrichment and academic exploration.

For more information, please contact [email protected]


St. Mark’s College offers graduate Certificates & Diplomas in Theological Studies, Religious Education, Pastoral Studies, and Catholic Educational Leadership. Students can apply to the program in one of these areas.

Graduate Diploma (24 credits)


The Graduate Diploma programs consist of 24 credits of core, elective and diploma specific course work.

  •     Graduate Diploma in Pastoral Studies
  •     Graduate Diploma in Religious Education
  •     Graduate Diploma (Theological Studies)
  •     Graduate Diploma in Catholic Educational Leadership

Graduate Certificate (15 credits)


The Graduate Certificate programs consist of 15 credits of core, elective and certificate specific course work. The Catholic Core, of 3 courses (9 credits), forms the basis of each Certificate; the last 2 courses (6 credits) are taken from the concentration courses of each program.

  •     Graduate Certificate in Pastoral Studies
  •     Graduate Certificate in Religious Education
  •     Graduate Certificate (Theological Studies)
  •     Graduate Certificate in Catholic Educational Leadership

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